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Thursday, July 10, 2008

Roselamoon


91

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Roselamoon 喜臨門飯店

If we want good food, then we always have to explore for it and for more. Like I went to a private kitchen hiding in a dilapidated wet market alley found out to be a stunning Thai-Chinese seafood specialty in China Town, the Jok Kitchen. Like I went to a superb Euro-Thai garden eatery in an old apartment where I need to overcome a fear factor to enter the rundown building and took the shabby lift before I found the paradise for both my soul and my palate, the Garden.

Today I have another mission, to take my friends to sample nostalgic Cantonese dishes with a real 60's Hong Kong tone in downtown Bangkok's Asok area. Before I dance with Roselamoon, a self-claimed Cantonese cuisine specialty, it took me a decade of waiting to sample her dishes where the restaurant is just opposite to my old office but I was hesitated to give it a try due to her dim and out-fashioned facade. I used to think Roselamoon maybe another Chinese eatery for the fat-pocket Japanese clientele (yes this area used to be the site of the Japanese Embassy and a major Japanese community in Bangkok) with inflated price but loose the authentication for a native Cantonese feast.

As twelve years go by, on one night I couldn't hold my curiosity longer to see why this die-hard restaurant can survive for decades in the even heavier competitive retail food market if she is no good! Took a deep breath I pushed the door only to stunt a few minutes with hesitation to move forward. In front of me a 60's look dining hall with almost empty tables (at 7pm!) covered with plastic table cloth in subtle flora pattern, the decoration is glittering (the 60's kind I mean) and look like a New Territories (part of Hong Kong) kind village restaurant in my childhood. On my left were two customers in one table, and to my right were a series of obsolete fish tanks only to accommodate lichen. No pain no gain! Go go go! Anyway it was still early, if the food was wrong then I could go cross the street for my favorite steak at Neil's Tavern.

The menu is as minimal as a single page laminated sheet, with around 50 items to offer. Browsed the whole menu the Roasted Pigeon Hong Kong Style caught my attention, as this is a simple dish but really hard to please gourmet. I am a pigeon eater. I like pigeon whether it is Chinese style or French style; and whether it is braised, drunken, or roasted. However, after sampled most prominent individual and hotel restaurants in Bangkok there is no one came close to those quality I used to eat in Hong Kong. Without high hope I still took the pigeon as my only attempt, if it was no good, then I could move to Neil's Tavern to continue my dinner; therefore, I even called to secure a table at 8.

The Roasted Pigeon Hong Kong Style arrived to the table, my eyes opened, hey she looked okay! At least from the appearance of the bird's color and the aroma from the pigeon I was convinced that the bird was deep-fried in a pool of fresh frying oil, not recycled oil that many restaurants do without any shame. I held the pigeon with my fingers to deliver the first piece for tasting, then I experienced the love at first bite! The skin was so crispy while the meat was moist and tender with a subtle seasoning not overpowered the natural flesh taste of the bird. Then the table at Neil's Tavern was canceled and more dishes were ordered at Roselamoon, and more revisit since that day!

Of course Roselamoon's menu isn't only about pigeon. The owner keeps the menu small to ensure offers in Roselamoon were all specialties. Tonight our appetizers were Roasted Pigeons Hong Kong Style (Baht 350 each), one for each person. In Hong Kong, there are a few pigeon specialty restaurants and we really take roasted pigeon as an appetizer. Followed were Stir-fried Iceberg Lettuce in Oyster Sauce, and Quick-boiled Hong Kong Kale in Oyster Sauce. They were ideal to clear some grease if we ate too much deep-fried food. The Stir-fried Curry Crab (Baht 780 for our crab/ Baht 1,000 per kilogram) was so marvelous in overall it yielded a well balanced taste from Indian curry and spices incorporated well with the crab meat itself, not overwhelming by the spicy taste from chilies as some famous seafood joints do. This is real Hong Kong style curry crab though it is not the Thai-Chinese kind. The Deep-fried Sand Goby with Soy Sauce (Baht 650 for our fish/ Baht 850 per kilogram) was one of the best selling dishes of the restaurant. Roselamoon refuses farmed sand goby in the result with better texture and taste, the natural way. Fried E-fu Noodles and Wok-fried Flat Noodles with Beef were the other Stars of the night alongside with the pigeon. To conclude the dinner we had Home-made Black Sesame Paste Desserts, home-made?

I was filled with nostalgia by dining at Roselamoon with my favorite childhood dishes namely the roasted pigeon, the curry crab HK taste, and the quick-boiled kale in oyster sauce, as well as the wok-fried flat noodles with beef. Not only these dishes were some of my childhood favorites but Roselamoon also cooked them the nostalgic way, those same culinary skill in the 60's - 70's of Hong Kong. For example, in the very old days boiled kale in oyster sauce should incorporate with fried lard to unlock the aromatic flavor of oyster sauce, nowadays due to healthy concern lard had been abandon in the kitchen. To bring back some good old days' memory once in a while by eating this kale in oyster sauce with lard at Roselamoon is acceptable. If you really don't want lard and MSG, tell the chef to avoid them.

I am delighted to narrow down Roselamoon as a roasted pigeon specialty in Bangkok rather than a broad Cantonese cuisine specialty though overall most dishes were delicious. Roselamoon also retraces my memory of those bestsellers juicy and tender roasted pigeons in Lung-wah Restaurant and Fung-lam Kitchen we enjoyed so much with my family in the 60's to 70's of Hong Kong.

Listen to mammy said not to judge by one's appearance (in this case a restaurant) may save myself twelve years of wasting of time until I sampled my favorite roasted pigeon in Bangkok. Be a good son/daughter then!

Roselamoon Chinese Restaurant ****1/4
165/5-6 Asok Road (Sukhumvit Soi 21)
Sukhumvit Road
Wattana, Bangkok 10110
Tel.: 02.258.3406

Open daily: Lunch 11am - 2pm; Dinner 6 - 10pm
Pay (food for two): around THB 800 without seafood (or THB 1,500 with them)

68 comments:

Stella said...

Yes yes yes. Bangkok is really my best city since 2005. This is the best city I have ever been to, in terms of good food, good price with quality and quantity, good people, good service, good massage, good shopping, and good memory.
Its rating has jumped from Number 3 to 1 may be contributed by Thai and Sea's blog, and all the readers' support.

Anonymous said...

Bangkok is also my number #1 city.
From Dick.

in the sea said...

What can I say... I have been to Bangkok more than any other cities.. :)

But also I should go and take a look at cities like Bueons Aires, Cape Town, Florence...

Anonymous said...

Yes I like Bangkok a lot. And I like this blog. This is the first time I got to see a blog. Thanks to the 2 bloggers.
From,
Mi

Anonymous said...

I go to Bangkok a lot, but 3/4 of the restaurants mentioned here were not known to me.

Stella said...

Mi,
Yes next time you shall go with me.

Anonymous said...

I am a local Thai but 90% of the restaurants mentioned were not known to me.
From,
A Thai in LA

Thailand Club said...

right, Thailand really has more to see, and Bangkok has more to eat, so i never ending sampling food and new restaurants

like tonight, i went to Thonglo Soi 9 to sample Mediterranean cuisine in a new restaurant (Aux Saveurs), lucky i went there before anyone does; it was the most awful western dinner i have had in Bangkok; i feel sorry the 2 good friends who being my company tonight

the owner cum chef may have enthusiasm to bring his Mediterranean cuisine to Bangkok's residents, the owner/chef is nice and friendly, but his cooking skill not, so i feel sorry for him too

next week i am going to show shark's fin, if there is no objection for foie gras from France, or whale sashimi from Japan, then shall be be not a problem of eating shark's fin soup

Stella said...

I am glad that finally there is some lousy food in Thailand. Now Thailand becomes more normal. Otheriwise it is too heavenly.
Your lousy food in Thailand may mean an above average food here in LA.

Stella said...

The topid of the Advertisement has been the same for 2 days-Dim Sum in LA.

Thailand Club said...

the AdSense in google tend to be localized, in LA u c LA's ads, in Bangkok we c Bangkok's ads, as in HK they c HK's ads

Stella said...

Wow,
So you mean that your HK readers will see ads in HK from Adsense? Or all readers see ads about LA since you registered in LA.
But like Sea's ad should be all about HK since he registered in HK? I will try his ad later. I never clicked ad from his blog.

Anonymous said...

This is a nice blog and Bangkok is a nice city. If people in Bangkok are as hard working and as smart as HK people, they might exceed HK. As HK has no natural resources at all while Thailand does(at least they have rice, which is now expensive in LA). Stella, please bring me a big bag of rice next time instead of the crispy pork.
Maggie from LA

Thailand Club said...

google and AdSense don't care where u registered, but they care who surfing from where, so they can sell 'local' advertisements

it doesn't make sense to c LA ads in Bangkok, or Bangkok ads in Hong Kong,
AdSense localized the ads. so do u get it Stella?

Anonymous said...

After seeing more of this blog, I even more agree to the no. 1 city going to Bangkok. Congratulation!

Man

Stella said...

Hi Thaisclub,
I sort of get it.
Maggie,
You shall read more of this blog and the other one.
Man,
Welcome back.

Stella said...

Today's ad is still Dim Sum in LA. Four days in a row.

Fillet-O said...

I enjoy a click to those Ads in google, sometimes quite fun to read some funny ads. Anyway no hurt as I don't click to pay!

Yai said...

Hurray so I live in the world No. 1 city - Bangkok!

Thailand Club said...

Stella, no need to tell me what the ads is today and everyday

Yai said...

Please go to the post of Spicy Maharaja at http://whispalms.blogspot.com,
a new guess game started.

Stella said...

Thank you Yai. I am going to join the guess game now.

in the sea said...

FYI, Stella made a "relayed" message (thru' me by email) onto the guess game on Maharaja. Interesting.... if I don't open email today she may lose and then claim the liability on me for not opening my email...haha

in the sea said...

Some of my friends told me Stella learned from China Olympic "relaying torches"... haha. Hope that she knows there is someone at the pick-up point for relaying.

Anonymous said...

Other media also reporting Bangkok being voted No.1 in Travel and Leisure Magazine this year. And TG (Thai Airways) is No.3 in airlines category.

I agree Bangkok is No.1 travel destination and this blog is my No.1 food blog to read.

/William

Anonymous said...

Thailand and Bangkok have caught up a lot for the past 10 years. I don't know if that relates with Thailand Club and In-the-Sea's contribution or not.

Anonymous said...

I do think In-the-Sea and Thaisclub did contribute to the success of Bangkok's being number one city in the world. As In-the-Sea promotes the tourist business by going there so often. And Thaisclub promotes the business by bringing so many people to eat there.
They shall get the award from Thai tourism.

Anonymous said...

Yes, I agreed from what I know from In the Sea. He told many friends and brought them as a free guide to Bangkok. After that, those friends told the other friends. Just like serviced apartment, he told us to try and some of friends did try (except me, sorry). He told me, he go with his sisters every year to Bangkok. I think it's the influence of the "mouth" of people. Some of his friends told Sea that now he had many "sons" and "daughters" in Bangkok and no need for him to take care. I know sometimes some friends called him to HK from Bangkok for advice to how to go to a shop they wanted to go. I think the same for Thailand Club. He must do the same and also has affected Sea on things in Bangkok.

Haha, I think they are the hidden tourist guides.

Man

Stella said...

Yes I totally agree with Anonymous and Man. Both Sea and Thailand Club are like the "yellow page", "411" and the hidden tour book of BKK.
I am one of the many who were introduced to BKK and now addicted to it.
Before I only like Hawaii, Hawaii, but now Thailand, Thailand, BKK, BKK.

Stella said...

Oh, I am now seeing BKK Airport for a straight 30 minutes from Jade Channel when TVB is interviewing the newly-wed Tony Leung and Lau Kai Ling and all the guests. They all have to transit at BKK airport to the destination. BKK airport looks very good.

in the sea said...

Actually I also need to thank for one of my best friends who seldom browse blogs. He mentioned to me many many times from 1990 to 1996 about how good BKK was. Actually my friend is not a detailed person, just telling me "good good good" and no concrete things. Until May 1997, I went with this friend on our way back from Milan/Rome for a stop over at BKK while taking Thai Airway. I was totally wrong then and fell in love with this city and then became a promoter for BKK's shopping and eating. I really all those good old time bringing my friends and families. They all got so surprised and then became a regular visitor to BKK. I can say no one ever regrets! So Bangkok deserves as the best no. 1 city for travel. Cheers!

Stella, at that time when I heard of so many problems of SUV Airport, I didn't know why I felt so depressed..., especially saying goodbye to Don Muang Airport, like saying goodbye to Kai Tak Airport. These 2 airports did bring me some good old memories.

Stella said...

I totally agreed with you In-the-Sea. I fell in love(at first sight) with BKK since 2005. I shall have discovered BKK earlier. Well never too late though. Now I keep promoting Thailand in LA and so far I have influenced about 10 interested parties.
Yes, I do miss SUV Airport the way I missed Kai Tak Airport(and HK overall).

Anonymous said...

Yes, that night when the light was turned off in Kai Tak Airport, it was quite sad. I like Kai Tak Airport because it's very near us and we can see airplane everyday.

Man

Thailand Club said...

so treasure CLK Airport now, one day if its light turn out, we will miss this world voted No.1 airport again like we miss KT

life is the same, treasure the present before too late, that's why i promote travel and good food, as that shall be part of our life, not just working or staying at the majong table

Stella said...

Yes Thailand Club is right. Let us all treasure what we have NOW before the "NOW" turns to a collective memory.
Appreciate good food, good friends, good blogs while we can. Enjoy life. Count your blessings. Treasure whatever we have(family, friends, our jobs...) and don't take anything for granted.
Thank you Thailand and In-the-Sea for your blogs.
Thank you all the readers for your comments that have enlightened this blog.
Thank you for the guessing game. Thank you Man for your logicaly input.

Anonymous said...

Suddenly it becomes very warm here. Yes, this blog and Sea's blog is very interesting. We share all of our comments and Stella made it lots of funs with many questions.

Thailand Club, where is CLK Airport?

Man

Stella said...

Man,
CLK Airport is your famous Int'l airport in HK(my guess).

in the sea said...

Yes, I think so, but officially it's should be HKG still because Kai Tak is no longer in service. Haha, Man, where is your guessing power this time?

I just checked on the internet and there is an official airport code as CLK. It's in Oklahoma.

Thailand Club said...

as u may aware that i am not using the IATA code, instead just the abbreviation of the name

in IATA code, we don't add the word 'airport' after an airport code, as Los Angeles International Airport and Tom Bradley International Terminal is LAX, not LAX Airport, we may either say LAX or LA Airport

for Hong Kong, we may either say HK Int'l Airport, CLK Airport (/KT Airport) or HKG

(but we don't say HKG Airport or CLK)

definitely CLK itself refers to another airport

Anonymous said...

Thank you bloggers for the education about airports.
I like Kai Tak Airport better than CLK Airport because Kai Tak is more convenient(in city)while CLK's location is more remote and it is also windy. However, I like all the stores inside the CLK airport.

John

Anonymous said...

Because you don't ask me to guess, so I am relax and don't know what CLK mean. After Check Lap Kwok islands were bombed to flat, I didn't have this name in my mind actually. Check Lap means some kind of red fish and the shape of this island look like that fish and also the land was no grass. I went there once a long time ago. Thank you both for telling me.

Man

Thailand Club said...

thanks Man for the red fish

Anonymous said...

You renew my memory. There was 2 Chek Lap Chau. One is called big Chek Lap and the other called small Chek Lap.

Anonymous said...

Thank you Man for the explanation. Now we all know CLK means a red Tilapia fish because of the shape of the "Lan Tao" Island.

in the sea said...

Very educational. I also recall there was some rare species of frog (very tiny one) in Chek Lap Chau before it was removed.

Anonymous said...

I almost thought that the one holding this award is Thailand Club until I read the words.
From,
Mi

Thailand Club said...

hahaha u r so cute

Anonymous said...

Thailand really picked up fast in the past 10 years. And even after the Tsunami, Phuket has picked up fast with no problem.
No wonder all the "rich and famous" like to stop by and transit at Thailand. Such as the newly wed Tony Leung and Lau Kai Ling. Also George Bush stopped by Thailand on the way to Beijing's Olympic opening ceremony.

Thailand Club said...

Bush full speech in Bangkok 2008-Aug-07 09:30

Laura and I are delighted to be back in Bangkok. We appreciate the gracious welcome extended by His Majesty the King and Her Majesty the Queen.


Above all, I bring America's warmest wishes to our oldest allies in Asia, the people of Thailand. Our friendship began 175 years ago this spring, when President Andrew Jackson dispatched an envoy to Siam. Negotiators soon concluded a treaty of peace and commerce and sealed it with a lotus flower on one side and an eagle and stars on the other. Generations of close friendship followed. At one point, the Thai King offered to send elephants to America. President Abraham Lincoln had to politely decline.


The values of freedom and openness that gave birth to our alliance have sustained it through the centuries. American troops and the Royal Thai Armed Forces have stood united from Korea and Vietnam to Afghanistan and Iraq. Our free market economies have surged forward on a rising tide of trade and investment. Tourism has boomed, as more people discover this beautiful and ancient land. And some 200,000 Thai Americans now enrich my nation with their enterprise, culture, and faith.


On this historic anniversary of our alliance, America looks to Thailand as a leader in the region and a partner around the world. I was proud to designate Thailand a major non-NATO ally of the United States. And I salute the Thai people on the restoration of democracy, which has proved that liberty and law reign here in the "Land of the Free."


In many ways, the story of Thailand is the story of this region. Over the past six decades, Asia has gone from an area mired in poverty and recovering from world war to a thriving and dynamic region. America has played a pivotal role in this transformation. By maintaining a stabilising military presence, we helped to free emerging nations from concerns about security. By pursuing strong diplomatic engagement, we helped once-hostile nations resolve their differences in peace. And by opening our markets to Asian exports, we helped powerful economies to take shape.


America is proud of these contributions. Yet the primary source of this region's success is its people. From South Korea to Singapore, nations pursued economic policies based on free enterprise, free trade, and the rule of law. The results have astounded the world. Last year, trade in goods between the United States and this side of the Pacific reached one trillion dollars. And in a striking change from the pattern of centuries, more trade now crosses the Pacific than the Atlantic.


With the rise of economic freedom has come a dramatic expansion of political liberty. After World War II, Australia and New Zealand were this region's only democracies. Today, the majority of Asian nations answer to their citizens. With this shift, the people of this region have defied the sceptics who claimed that "Asian values" were incompatible with liberty. Free societies have emerged in largely Buddhist Thailand, largely Hindu India, largely Muslim Indonesia, largely Shinto Japan and the largely Christian Philippines. As freedom has taken root, peace has followed. And the region has gone decades without a major war.


Some have called this transformation "The Asian Miracle." In truth, it is no miracle at all. It is evidence of universal truths: The passion for liberty transcends culture and faith. Free markets unleash innovation and blaze the path to prosperity. And trusting in the natural talent and creativity of a nation's people is the surest way to build a vibrant and hopeful society.


When I became President, I brought a conviction that America is a Pacific nation and that our interests and ideals alike require stronger engagement in Asia than ever before. So over the past seven years, America has pursued four broad goals in the region: to reinvigorate our alliances to forge new relationships with countries that share our values to seize new opportunities for prosperity and growth and to confront shared challenges together.


Confident and purposeful alliances are the best way to advance peace and prosperity in Asia. America has five treaty alliances in Asia. We take them seriously, and we have bolstered each one. We signed a new treaty with Australia that deepens our cooperation in defense trade. We helped the Philippines upgrade its military capabilities. We have strengthened security initiatives here in Thailand. We are improving our force posture in South Korea by working to move our troops out of cities and towns and into more strategically effective positions. And we have reinforced our close alliance with Japan by launching new missile defense initiatives and by transforming our troop posture in a way that preserves our strong position to maintain peace in the Pacific.


All these steps were designed to reassure our allies that America will stand firmly beside them in any test we face. I also worked to develop strong personal relationships with our allies' elected leaders. These friendships are built on a foundation of honesty, respect, and shared values. And when a new occupant moves into the White House next year, America's alliances in Asia will be the strongest they have ever been.


As America has revitalised our treaty alliances, we have forged deeper ties with other free nations in Asia. Countries that share our democratic ideals should be natural partners of the United States. Yet when I took office, our relations with many free nations in Asia were strained. For example, America has dramatically improved our ties with India — the world's largest democracy — including a historic agreement on civilian nuclear energy.


We have also turned around our relationship with Indonesia, which is home to more Muslims than any other nation on Earth. We have partnered closely with Indonesia's freely elected government to help develop the institutions of a vibrant democracy after decades under military rule. We have signed a landmark agreement with Mongolia to help boost democratic development. We have enhanced cooperation with the thriving countries of ASEAN, which is now chaired by the great nation of Thailand. And we have joined with free nations throughout the region to establish a new Asia Pacific Democracy Partnership the region's only organisation whose sole focus is promoting democratic values and institutions in Asia.


Overall, America has improved our relationships with all of Asia's major powers at the same time. Experts would have said this was impossible because of the historical tensions between these nations. But something has rendered the old patterns obsolete: In an era of integrated markets and common threats, the expansion of freedom in one nation benefits all other free nations. This change marks a sharp departure from the zero-sum mentality of the past. And this change provides a clear charge for the future: Every nation in this region has a stake in ensuring that Asia continues to grow in liberty, prosperity, and hope.


One of the most powerful drivers of liberty, prosperity, and hope is trade. When I took office, America had free trade agreements in force with only three countries, none of them in Asia. Today we have agreements in force with 14 countries, including Australia and Singapore. We have concluded a promising agreement with South Korea, which I am pushing the United States Congress to pass. We have begun negotiating a free trade agreement with Malaysia and a bilateral investment treaty with Vietnam. We look forward to resuming trade negotiations with Thailand. And we have supported the vision of a Free Trade Area of the Asia Pacific, which would bring down trade barriers across this region. The nations of the Asia Pacific now have more vibrant trade and investment ties than ever. And workers, consumers, and entrepreneurs across this region will reap the benefits for years to come.


Unfortunately, America sometimes sends mixed signals about the openness of our economy. Voices of economic isolationism do not represent the interests of the American people. For decades, America has maintained a bipartisan commitment to flexible, open markets. This must not change. I urge people across this region to reject protectionism in your own countries. Together, we can lead the world toward more growth, more jobs, and more opportunities by staying open to investment and trade.


For all the gains we have made, our nations still face challenges, and we are working to confront them together:


Together, we are confronting the threat of terror. With partners across this region, we have captured or killed some of the world's most dangerous terrorists. We are also working to counter the hateful ideology of the extremists with a more hopeful alternative. We strongly support democracies like Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia, which are making determined stands against extremism and showing that Islam and tolerance go hand-in-hand. Many of America's friends in Asia have also stood with us in Afghanistan and Iraq, where newly free people are replacing decades of fear with a future of hope. America is proud to stand with so many brave partners in answering the calling of our time. And no matter how difficult the task may be, we will not relent until this ideological struggle is won.


Together, we are confronting the threat posed by North Korea. The nations of Northeast Asia all have an urgent stake in ensuring that Pyongyang does not threaten the region with nuclear weapons. Yet when I took office, there was no way for these nations to approach North Korea with a unified front. So America joined with China, South Korea, Japan, and Russia to create the Six-Party Talks. Faced with concerted pressure from all its neighbors, North Korea has pledged to dismantle its nuclear facilities and give up its nuclear weapons. Recently the regime submitted a declaration of its nuclear activities. Now the North Korean regime must commit to help us verify the declaration and address outstanding concerns about its behavior, including its proliferation and uranium enrichment. The other five parties will stand united until we reach our ultimate goal: a Korean Peninsula free of oppression and free of nuclear weapons. And the United States will continue to insist that the regime in Pyongyang end its harsh rule and respect the dignity and human rights of the North Korean people.


Together, we seek an end to tyranny in Burma. This noble cause has many devoted champions, and I happen to be married to one of them. Today, Laura is traveling to the Thai-Burmese border, where she is visiting a resettlement camp and a medical clinic. America reiterates our call on Burma's military junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners. And we will continue working until the people of Burma have the freedom they deserve.


Together, we are confronting other serious challenges to our people and our prosperity. Governments across the region have coordinated efforts to address pandemics like avian flu. The major economies of the region are working for a global climate agreement that improves energy security and cuts greenhouse gases without cutting economic growth. And the region has come together to respond to natural disasters, from the tsunami of 2004 to this year's cyclone. With all these partnerships, we are deepening trust and openness among our nations. And we are ensuring that whatever challenges the future may bring, the nations of the Asia Pacific will meet them together.


One question on the minds of many here in Asia and many around the world is the future direction of China. I have been fascinated by China since my first trip there in 1975, when my dad was head of the United States Liaison Office in Beijing. At the time, the country was just emerging from the Cultural Revolution. Poverty was rampant. The streets swarmed with bicycles. People were wearing almost identical clothes. And it seemed unimaginable that three decades later Beijing would be sprinting into the modern era covered in skyscrapers, filled with cars, home to international businesses, and hosting the Olympic Games.


Over the years, America has had complex relations with China. When I took office, I was determined to set our relationship on a sturdy, principled footing. The four goals we have pursued in Asia — reinforcing our alliances, forming new democratic partnerships, deepening our economic ties, and cooperating on shared challenges — have given America and our allies valuable new platforms from which to confidently engage China. A peaceful and successful future for this region requires the strong involvement of both China and the United States so America's engagement throughout the Asia Pacific must be purposeful and enduring.


China and the United States share important economic interests. The growth sparked by China's free market reforms is good for the Chinese people, who are building a confident middle class with a stake in a peaceful future. China's new purchasing power is also good for the world, because it provides an enormous market for exports from across the globe. The key to ensuring that all sides benefit is insisting that China adhere to the rules of the international economic system. So America strongly supported China's accession to the World Trade Organisation, where we are able to contest trade practices that we find unfair. We are disappointed that the Doha Round of trade talks has stalled, and we will continue to engage China and other nations to help reach a successful conclusion.


America has also established a new strategic economic dialogue with China, where we discuss ways to ensure long-term growth and widely shared prosperity in both our economies, as well as issues like currency exchange rates and intellectual property rights. Through these discussions and others, we are making clear to China that being a global economic leader carries with it the duty to act responsibly on matters from energy to the environment to development in Africa.


America and China have found other key areas of cooperation. We are partnering to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and China has played a critical leadership role in the Six-Party Talks. America has also stressed our determination to maintain peace across the Taiwan Strait. From the beginning of my presidency, I have stated clearly that America's approach to Taiwan would be based on our longstanding "one-China" policy, our three joint communiques, and our steadfast commitment to the security of Taiwan's democracy under the Taiwan Relations Act. I have also articulated a principle that there should be no unilateral attempts by either side to alter the status quo. As a result of this frank engagement and firm diplomacy, the tensions that once roiled the Taiwan Strait have calmed, and we are witnessing a new period of stability and peace.


Our constructive relationship in these areas has placed America in a better position to be honest and direct on other issues. I have spoken clearly, candidly, and consistently with China's leaders about our deep concerns over religious freedom and human rights. And I have met repeatedly with Chinese dissidents and religious believers. The United States believes the people of China deserve the fundamental liberty that is the natural right of all human beings. So America stands in firm opposition to China's detention of political dissidents, human rights advocates, and religious activists. We speak out for a free press, freedom of assembly, and labour rights not to antagonise China's leaders, but because trusting its people with greater freedom is the only way for China to develop its full potential. And we press for openness and justice not to impose our beliefs, but to allow the Chinese people to express theirs. As Chinese scientist Xu Liangying has said: "Human nature is universal and needs to pursue freedom and equality."


Ultimately, only China can decide what course it will follow. America and our partners are realistic, and we are prepared for any possibility. I am optimistic about China's future. Young people who grow up with the freedom to trade goods will ultimately demand the freedom to trade ideas, especially on an unrestricted Internet. Change in China will arrive on its own terms and in keeping with its own history and traditions. Yet change will arrive. And it will be clear for all to see that those who aspire to speak their conscience and worship their God are no threat to the future of China. They are the people who will make China a great nation in the 21st century.


This is my last trip to East Asia as President. I have great confidence that Asia will continue to grow in opportunity, achievement, and influence. I am confident because I know the creative and enterprising spirit of this region's people. I am confident because the forces of freedom and hope that unleashed the transformation of Asia can never be turned back. And I am confident because I know the bonds between America and our friends in Asia will never be broken.


When forces from Imperial Japan entered Thailand during World War II, the Thai ambassador in Washington was directed to declare war on the United States. He bravely refused to deliver the declaration. In turn, America refused to recognise Thailand as our enemy. Instead, we helped Thais in America band together in a movement called Seri Thai. They deployed across the Pacific, infiltrated behind enemy lines, and gathered intelligence that helped speed the liberation of this great land.


Several members of the Seri Thai movement are still with us. They have the lasting gratitude of the American people. And all in this region can count on a solemn promise from the United States: America stood with the free people of Asia in the past. We stand with the free people of Asia today. And we will stand with the free people of Asia long into your bright future.


Thank you, and may God bless you all.

in the sea said...

I haven't gone thru' it in details. Just read the beginning and the end parts. What a good English lesson at the last paragraph - past tense, present tense and future tense! This is what a politician speaks - extends something unnecessary. Next time I will tell my sister "I bought Vitasoy milk in the past. I buy Vitasoy milk now. I shall buy Vitasoy milk in the future."... :)

Anonymous said...

Haha, in the Sea, I liked what you said, and I like what you say, and I shall like what you will say.

Man

Thailand Club said...

so naughty

i will send ur comments to Bush so ur visa (to the US) will soon be revoked

Anonymous said...

haha... well said! This made my weekend so happy. This makes my weekend so happy. This will make my weekend so happy.

My name is Chan Tai Man. Thanked you. Thank you and shall thank you.

in the sea said...

I don't think Mr. Bush is such an insensible man because of someone speaking something about him. Mr. Bush is such a man often urging (for the other Countries) to raise the level of human rights which include the freedom of speech. In this connection, he should appreciate this part for showing the freedom of speech which he often talks about.

Thailand Club said...

*comments above have nothing to do with Roselamoon

comments on Roselamoon starts here and below

Anonymous said...

Must be an antique shop la.

/William

Anonymous said...

I take it a watch shop.

Yai said...

I definitely know what is this Roselamoon as my office share the same main street with her.

in the sea said...

haha.. once choice is "others". OK, I would guess it's a Cantonese restaurant.

Stella said...

It is a Frencg Restaurant.

Stella said...

What a good speech from Bush.
What a good comment from every one of the readers too.

Stella said...

What is the deadline and the rule? 5 guesses per person?
What is the prize?

Anonymous said...

The mood of this photo looks like another photo of the Sea's blog, but that restaurant is not a Cantonese restaurant. From the restaurant's name, it sounds like a French. However, the wood decoration is really old Chinese. I think it's a Cantonese restaurant because some old time Cantonese restauant had some foreign or european name, like Yucca de Lac for 雍雅山房. So my guess is Cantonese restaurant.

Man

Anonymous said...

Stella, you need five guesses for the multiple choice while only six to choice from?

Anonymous said...

Oh, I mean French Restaurant.
From,
Stella

Stella said...

What a detailed and descriptive introduction to this low-key Cantonese restaurant. This reminds me of those local good restaurants in Sha Tin and Yuen Long we went in our childhood.
Good discovery Mr. Thailand Club.

Yai said...

I went dinner with my colleagues yesterday. Even though Cantonese food is on bland side but all of us enjoy the dinner so much. The kalan HK was very interesting with the lard, we never try kalan can taste so good. Hey TC why you tell us about Roselamoon so late har!

Next time call me if you have something very good, na na!

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